Quick Answer: Should A 7 Year Old Attend A Funeral?

What age is appropriate for a child to attend a funeral?

If you like you can ask your funeral director for their advice.

Often families choose not to take babies and children under the age of about 3, as they are concerned that they might be noisy.

Children old enough to know what is happening should generally be given the choice to attend and their decision respected..

How do you explain a funeral to a 7 year old?

Clear words such as ‘he has died’ are easier for children to understand than ‘lost’ ‘passed away’ or ‘gone to the stars’. Allow for time together for comfort, support and any questions they may ask. Answer questions honestly, but keep explanations short, clear and appropriate for their age and understanding.

At what age does a child understand death?

Children begin to grasp death’s finality around age 4. In one typical study, researchers found that 10 percent of 3-year-olds understand irreversibility, compared with 58 percent of 4-year-olds. The other two aspects of death are learned a bit later, usually between age 5 and 7.

Should a child view an open casket?

For instance, if there will be a viewing with an open casket, the child needs to know that. The child also needs to know that it’s OK to touch their parent’s body, but they should not be made to do so. The child may want to give something to the parent, by putting it in the casket, the ground, or the cremation urn.

How do you explain a funeral to an 8 year old?

Encourage your children to go to the funeral or memorial service. Explain that you are a family and this is an important family event. Let them know that you expect them to go with you….Touch the person or the casket if they want to.Draw a picture.Visit with guests.Share memories of the person who has died.

Should a 10 year old go to a funeral?

There is no right or wrong answer. But offering your child the option to go is one opportunity for them to say ‘goodbye’ to a special person. … But most children have a full understanding of death by the time they are about 8-10 years old and many younger children will have enough understanding to go to the funeral.

When should you not go to a funeral?

Unless the family wants the funeral or memorial service to be private, you are welcome to attend. If you are close to the bereaved or the deceased, live close by and have no extenuating circumstances, then, by all means, go to the funeral. In fact, if you don’t go, your presence may be missed.

Does a 10 year old understand death?

At 10 years old, most children begin to understand that death is a universal, irreversible, and nonfunctional state (meaning that dead beings cannot do the things that the living do).

Should a child go to their parents funeral?

Adults often want to protect children from painful events. But children who have not been allowed to attend a funeral may find it difficult to accept the reality of the death. … No child, of any age, should be forced to go to the funeral home or to the service.

How do you tell a child their grandparent has died?

When talking about death, use simple, clear words. To break the news that someone has died, approach your child in a caring way. Use words that are simple and direct. For example, “I have some sad news to tell you. Grandma died today.” Pause to give your child a moment to take in your words.

Should an 8 year old attend a funeral?

As a general guideline, children should be allowed to attend a wake, funeral and burial if they want to. … Children should never be forced to attend a funeral or memorial service. It is important, however, to understand a child’s reasons for not wanting to attend so that their fears or questions can be addressed.

How do you explain a coffin to a child?

Tell them that everyone will drive to the cemetery where the casket will be buried. Explain to them that everyone will gather around the grave, a special hole that is a dug in the ground, to say prayers and to place flowers on the casket. Explain cremation if the body will be cremated.

What age group fears death the most?

The fear studies show that children’s fears can be grouped into five categories. One of these categories is death and danger. This response was found amongst children age 4 to 6 on the KFQ, and from age 7 to 10. Death is the most commonly feared item and remains the most commonly feared item throughout adolescence.